Jack May Plans to Just Be Himself Against Josh Copeland at Professional Fighters League

Though he was only able to get one bout in for 2017, heavyweight Jack May made the most of his singular opportunity.

Matched up with Dave Cryer at Bellator 170 in January of last year, May was able to pick up an impressive first round TKO just 40 seconds into the bout.

“We got the call from Bellator and we were excited about that,” May told MMAWeekly.com. “They gave us a local opponent in Dave Cryer. I didn’t know much about him. We went about training like we do every camp; trying to prepare myself to be the best I can be.

“We figured we should get back to the way I used to fight and try and put this guy away quick and early. It just so happened that I caught him with a right hand, dropped him, and went in and finished him.”

Having been over a year and a half since the win over Cryer, May has maintained a stoic attitude and has avoided letting his lack of activity bring him down.

“We had fights were went through five or six opponents in a camp,” said May. “It’s just one of those things that happens. My first coach told me it’s just something you’ll have to get used to. It’s part of the business.

“You’ve just got to trust the process and remain positive. I believe God has a plan, and this is the plan he has for me, so we’re going to stay the course.”

For his first fight of 2018, May (8-3) will face Josh Copeland (16-4) in a main card heavyweight bout at Professional Fighters League 2018 Regular Season 1 on Thursday in New York, N.Y.

“Josh Copeland is a tough opponent,” May said. “I’m very familiar with him. He’s shorter than me by seven inches. I know he likes to stand and strike, but he comes from a wrestling background.

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“I just need to go out and implement my game plan. Everybody knows I’m a striker and am going to try to keep him at bay. If he comes in, he’ll eat a lot of punches. We’ve worked on a lot of footwork and movement and stuff like that. Just be myself and do what I do.”

With PFL’s seasonal format leading into playoffs to determine a champion, May pretty much knows what his path ahead could be in 2018 and he couldn’t be happier.

“It’s one of those organizations where they have a roster, so it’s not like they’re not going to have guys for me to fight,” said May. “I’m fighting in June and then again in August, and depending on how I do in August it determines the (playoff) seeding for October. You win there you move on. The ball is in your court and I like that.”