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Working Class Fitness: Don’t Sping Your Wheels, It Only Works If You Can Do It

Posted on by Matt Wiggy Wiggins

Working Class Fitness LogoSome of the most beneficial fitness and exercise principles are also the most basic.

For example, take this idea: “An exercise is only good for you if you can do it.”

That’s a pretty “duh” statement, isn’t it?  I mean, if you can’t do something, then there’s pretty much no way it can help you out or make you better, is there?

Yet, people seem to forget about this simple idea almost every single day.

How many times have you seen someone recommend a certain type of exercise, just because of the benefits it can provide?

I see this a lot with various gymnastics movements.  It happens all the time with Olympic lifts, too.

Now both of these are *excellent* ways to work out, build strength, get explosive, and more.  But they’re only excellent if you can make them excellent or do them in an excellent fashion.

If your upper body is strong, but you can’t do a planche hold, then I don’t care what gymnasts can do with planche holds – they won’t do YOU any good.  Why not? Because you can’t do them.

And you can be explosive as hell, but if your barbell snatch form sucks, you’re never ripping a decent weight to overhead.  Which means that while snatches might be an exercise that you can build a lot of explosive power with, if you can’t use it with any real weight (compared to how strong you are as a whole), then so what?

So does it do you any good to do either one?

Now if you wanna get good at them for the sake of getting good at them, then that’s cool.  Or if there’s some way that they’d directly help what you train for, then you should practice them and become proficient at doing such movements.

But if you’re NOT already proficient with such movements, yet you can get the same benefits (strength, explosiveness, or whatever) from other, more efficient forms of training, then shouldn’t you just do that?

I think so.

A buddy of mine recently linked me to a newer exercise video on YouTube.   It was another one of these “movement” deals where this guy is all about moving the body in crazy ways and such.  Think parkour meets gymnastics in the park or something.

It was totally cool.  The guy was in amazing shape and could do some really awesome stuff.  The only problem was that the vast majority of what he was showing off takes crazy amounts of technique to actually be able to do; technique that 99% of people don’t have.

But should those people take the time to strive to build such technique?

The guy in the video said he sometimes practices his “movement” (i.e. – all the different types of exercise he does) for six hours a day or more.  Which is awesome.  For him.

Personally, I don’t have six hours a day to practice new movements.  I gotta get my workout done and get to taking care of my responsibilities.

Fighters who have a ton of skills work to do have the same needs; they can’t be doing stuff just for the sake of doing stuff.

While many of these really cool-looking types of exercises, fitness, or the like may be very “efficient” in that they’ll accomplish a lot at once, they’re only efficient if you can make them that way.

If you’re spending more time learning how to do the exercise than you are actually doing it (therefore, benefitting from it) in the first place, then that’s not efficient at all.


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