- A WORD FROM THE ASIAN SENSATION…

April 21, 2008
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Editorial by Al Yu – MMAWeekly.com







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- adj.

1. Being
entirely without flaw or imperfection.

2. Perfect

 

Last year, Canada’s
Georges St. Pierre fulfilled a life long dream by defeating welterweight legend
Matt Hughes in a highly anticipated rematch and thus claiming the UFC 170-pound
Championship. St. Pierre instantly rose to the top of the welterweight
rankings.

 

Five months
later, the unthinkable happened.

 

Having
earned a title shot by winning the fourth season of the Ultimate Fighter, Matt “The
Terror” Serra dethroned St. Pierre in his first title defense. Serra defied
monumental odds and capped off what was arguably the biggest upset in mixed martial
arts history.

 

One year
later, the highly anticipated rematch has come and gone.

 

Georges St.
Pierre proved again why he is considered the number one welterweight fighter in
the world by executing a flawless game plan en route to defeating Serra this
past weekend. Serra had no answer for the now two-time champion. St. Pierre
fought intelligently, nullifying Serra’s strengths while utilizing his
wrestling to control the fight on the ground.

 

A
frustrated Serra could be seen walking back to his team at the end of the
opening round. The frustration didn’t end there. The second round mimicked
the first with St. Pierre dominating all aspects of the fight. After many
unanswered strikes and knees, referee Yves Lavigne was forced to put a halt to the
match.

 

In front of
a frenzied hometown crowd, St. Pierre regained his confidence and avenged a
loss. He executed a masterful game plan to reclaim the belt he worked hard to
get. Most importantly, he redeemed himself.

 

A future
meeting with Jon Fitch is seemingly inevitable.

 

 

Strap on
Your Running Shoes…

 

Forget
about Mark Hominick vs. Jorge Gurgel. For fans who remember that fight, it
doesn’t hold a candle to what we witnessed this past weekend.

 

Hominick
may have pumped up his sneakers to play hard to get during his less than
desirable outing against Gurgel, but Starnes displayed the athleticism that
only track runners dream about. Starnes refused to engage with Nate Quarry who
chased him around over three rounds, much to the displeasure of the crowd.

 

It was a shameful
performance by Starnes.

 

Thank you,
Nate Quarry. Thank you for providing the most hilariously entertaining final
thirty seconds in MMA history. We can now all look forward to a flood of
animated gifs.

 

 

A Star
in the Making

 

Who is Cain
Velasquez?

 

The world
finally got to see a potential heavyweight star in the making this past
weekend. The two-time PAC-10 Wrestler of the Year made an impressive Octagon
debut, finishing Brad Morris with strikes in dominating fashion.

 

Most fans
weren’t familiar with Velasquez prior to his UFC debut. He now has just three
professional fights under his belt. What he lacks in experience, he makes up
for with his ability to adapt and learn quickly. Coupled with his excellent
physical conditioning and wrestling prowess, Velasquez is on his way to being
the next big thing.

 

Velasquez
trains at American Kickboxing Academy, home to fighters such as Mike Swick,
Josh Koscheck, and Jon Fitch. For the last year and a half, Cain has been
refining his kickboxing under the tutelage of former world champion Javier
Mendez and been training with Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu and Judo black belt Dave
Camarillo.

 

Most
fighters aren’t fortunate enough to have an opportunity to compete in the UFC
at such an early stage in their careers. Velasquez took full advantage of the
opportunity and did so with an impressive performance.

 

Keep an eye
on Cain Velasquez; he is a fighter on the rise.

 

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